Category

IAL

The (dis)advantageous relationship between International Organisations and their host countries: the Austrian experience

By | Administrative Law, Centre of Excellence, Civil Servants, Employment Disputes, IAL, International Administrative Law, International Organisations | No Comments

 

The relationship between International Organisations (IOs) and their host countries creates some interesting legal and political issues which do not always sit happily together: on the one hand, IOs have broad autonomy and enjoy a remarkable number of privileges and immunities (which are generally a grey area for the host country’s authorities) yet, on the other hand, the IOs are an important resource for the host country in terms of economy and visibility.

In considering this relationship, the Latin expression “do ut des”, which means “give and receive” or, perhaps more accurately, “give to receive” is particularly relevant to the subject matter. In fact, in principle, hosting international organisations is convenient and “remunerative” but it implies the loss of sovereignty of the host country in some fields (e.g. see the extraterritoriality of the international premises) and the conferment of a number of privileges and immunities to the international organisations (inter alia, the immunity from national courts).

Privileges are exemptions from the otherwise applicable substantive law of a state, while immunities are usually regarded as exemptions from the administrative, adjudicatory, or executive powers of a state[1]. Typical privileges of IOs are partial exemptions from some areas of domestic law (such as taxes, customs, foreign exchange controls, immigration), the most common of which is the exemption from the obligation to pay any direct taxes for the IO itself and its employees (while for indirect taxes, reimbursement schemes are frequently agreed)[2]. However, the most important and significant immunity enjoyed by the IOs is that from legal suit, the so-called “jurisdictional immunity”, which can raise different interpretations but the existence of which is not controversial. What is controversial is its scope, i.e., whether it is absolute, restrictive or functional. Most treaties or agreements usually confer a functional immunity, which is not a crystal clear concept, especially for the national authorities that have to face the grey area of IOs’ immunities. It seems that, in practice, the concept of functional immunity frequently leads to a de facto absolute immunity[3].

While financial privileges’ disputes are mainly settled on a diplomatic level, the jurisdictional immunities have generated the most extensive case law in domestic court decisions, which provide “examples for judicial dialogues or conversations crossing national jurisdictional borders”[4]. National courts adopted different approaches to the jurisdictional immunity of IOs also in consideration of the legal system in place, i.e. common or civil law system, the first relying on precedent decisions, the latter on a “constant jurisprudence” that stems from codified legal sources. However, the common denominator is that national courts, in deciding whether to grant the jurisdictional immunity, rely on the availability of alternative dispute settlement methods. With the 1999 Waite and Kennedy v. Germany judgment of the ECtHR, the obligation for IOs to provide an alternative access to justice (namely, an effective internal justice system, comparable to the national one) has been directly linked to the awarding or not of the immunity from the national process. By way of a concrete example, if a national court can be persuaded that the existing mechanism within an IO is insufficient to afford the staff member proper protections of his or her employment rights, it could waive the IO’s immunity in the specific case and proceed to a judicial review of its internal justice system, with consequences on the immunities.

Therefore, in order to enjoy the privileges and immunities there is a “contractual exchange” whereby international organisations must fulfil their side of the bargain, by providing staff member who are subject to those immunities with access to appropriate and sufficient systems of justice as they might expect in domestic jurisdictions[5]. The privileges and immunities of international organisations cannot be considered inalienable if they conflict with the fundamental rights and principles of the host country, of the European Union and fundamental and basic principles of human rights. In short, immunities from legal suit do not give the IOs carte blanche to do as they see fit: this point is all the more pertinent where tortious harm has been caused to the staff member at the hands of the defendant organisation and the functional immunities from legal suit do not extend to such circumstances. The same concept applies to the immunity from enforcement measures, regularly enjoyed by IOs. Even if a domestic court is allowed to rule against an IO, the judgment cannot be directly enforced due to the Organisation’s strong immunity shield from enforcement measures. However, in this case, domestic courts have applied the Waite and Kennedy doctrine where the claimant does not have a reasonable alternative mean of enforcement.

On the other hand, being an International Organisation’s member state is commonly considered beneficial for both state and society, therefore being a host state creates particular advantages. The Austrian government described the presence of IOs in Vienna as an important goal of its foreign policy because it positively affects the country’s reputation and influence in international relations and has positive effects on the local economy.[6] Thus, Austria and the other countries hosting IOs have an interest in the smooth functioning of the Organisations present on their territory and in their freedom from unilateral interference, which generally originates from provisions in treaties and domestic legislation on IOs legal personality and their privileges and immunities. In this regard, it should be noted that Austria occasionally extends privileges and immunities to events related to IOs (such as seminars or meeting) or grants them to international entities whose status as IOs is uncertain such as, the OSCE, which is more a political organisation rather than an international humanitarian one and the CTBTO, which is a treaty signed and ratified by many countries but which cannot enter into force and become binding until all the nuclear technology holder countries sign and ratify it.  However, Austria, throughout the years showed a balanced approach towards IOs’ immunities when those immunities negatively affected third parties’ rights, in particular their right of access to justice. In fact, in Austria the ECHR (see, in particular, article 6) enjoys constitutional rank (like in most civil law European legislations) and the access to justice is part of the treaty law such as, for example, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR 1966, in particular, article 4); in addition, it is considered a norm of customary international law, thus binding both IOs and States[7].

During the Cold War, Austria served as platform for international dialogue, due to its geopolitical position and its neutral status. This role of “international hub” was strengthened by the opening in 1979 of the Vienna International Centre (VIC), also called UNO City. Since then, Vienna is seat of the United Nations (UN), together with New York, Geneva and Nairobi. The idea of the VIC born in 1966, when the Government of Austria made an offer to the United Nations to construct in Vienna an International Centre to be used by organisations belonging to the United Nations system. In 1967, the Government of Austria and the city of Vienna jointly decided to assign an area on the left bank of the Danube as the site of the centre and in 1968 organised an international competition for the design of the buildings, which attracted the interest of architects worldwide and was in the end won by the Austrian Johann Staber. The Government of Austria (65%) and the city of Vienna (35%) shared the VIC construction costs (approximately 640 million Euros)[8]. The construction site began in 1972 and the VIC complex, which covers an area of 180,000 m² and has extraterritorial status, was inaugurated on 23rd August 1979. Separate agreements were signed by Austria and, respectively, IAEA and the United Nations (on behalf of UNIDO and the other United Nations entities in Vienna) on 28 September 1979. The Government of Austria handed over the VIC complex to the United Nations and IAEA for the symbolic rental sum of one Austrian schilling (equivalent to 0.07 euro today) a year for 99 years[9].

Over the years, the presence of international entities in Austria grew exponentially and it is now quite impressive: more than 40 IOs, financial institutions, diplomatic representations, NGOs and Quasi-NGOs are present on the Austrian territory and constitute an important economic factor, too. They employ more than 6000 employees, out of which about a quarter are Austrian citizens. According to a recent study by Ernst & Young, the sector spends about 725 million Euros per year, which result in a macroeconomic demand effect of about 1.4 billion Euros and thus contributes to GDP growth and Austria’s prosperity. In the long-term, all indicators demonstrate the economic benefit of the sector, in particular, conference activities increased by one third in the period 2010 – 2014[10]. In this regard, for example, the nuclear negotiations with Iran, successfully completed in Vienna in July 2015, and the “Syria talks” held since autumn 2015, generated a publicity value equivalent to 100 million Euros.

Further to encourage the settlement of International Organisations, Austria incentives also Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) to choose it as their seat. In fact, upon request of an organisation, the Federal Ministry for Europe, Integration and Foreign Affairs may grant the legal status of Non-Governmental Organisation by decree, on the legal basis of the Federal Law on the Granting of Privileges to Non-Governmental International Organisations. NGOs not only are an important expression of the civil society, they also enrich the thematic work of International Organisations. In relation to this, since 2016, NGOs have the possibility to apply for recognition as Quasi-International Organisations upon the fulfilment of certain requirements: the organisation must have non-profit character, its structure has to be similar to that of an IO, it must have permanent staff and an appropriately equipped office in Austria; in addition, its work must be related to the mandate of an established IO.  On the other hand, the legal status of Quasi-International Organisation implies certain tax exemptions. A recent example of an organisation, which has been awarded the status of Quasi-International Organisation and that chose Vienna as its seat, is the “Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All)”. It started its activities in summer 2013 and established its permanent headquarters in Vienna in 2015. SE4All is headed by the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General for “Sustainable Energy for All” and therefore fulfils all the above-mentioned requirements[11].

Overall the relationship between IOs, NGOs and Austria can be described as extremely positive and fruitful for both parties. However, the other side of the medal is that the host country tends to avoid conflicts on the privileges and immunities granted to the IOs and on the “grey area” constituted by the jurisdictional immunity. Therefore, there is still room for a more regulated and transparent cooperation between the IOs and the national authorities in order to grant the IOs’ employees and, in general, the third parties involved in disputes with IOs, the full respect of their civil fundamental rights.

 

Ludovica Moro

ludovicamoro@brettonwoodslaw.com

 

[1] A. Reinisch, International Organisations Before National Courts.

[2] A. Reinisch, The Privileges and Immunities of International Organisations in Domestic Courts.

[3] See supra note 2.

[4] See supra note 2.

[5] This is a well-established principle also in the Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations. A commentary on the Convention by Professor August Reinisch states: “The de facto “absolute” immunity of the United Nations is mitigated by the fact that article VIII, section 29, of the Convention requires the United Nations to “make provisions for appropriate modes of settlement of: (a) disputes arising out of contracts or other disputes of a private law character to which the United Nations is a party”. The General Convention’s obligation to provide for alternative dispute settlement in case of the Organisation’s immunity from legal process can be regarded as an acknowledgment of the right of access to court as contained in all major human rights instruments.” (http://www.un.org/law/avl/ )

[6] A. Reinisch, The Privileges and Immunities of International Organisations in Domestic Courts.

[7] See supra note 6.

[8] Source: United Nations Office in Vienna (UNOV) website.

[9] See supra note 8

[10] Source: Austrian governmental website – www.bmeia.gv.at

[11] See supra note 10

lecture_paris

BWL lectures on international administrative law at the universities of Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne) and Paris II (Panthéon- Assas)

By | IAL, International Administrative Law, News | No Comments

On 18th November 2016, Bretton Woods Law barrister Alex Haines gave a lecture at the renowned Parisian universities of Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne) and Paris 2 (Panthéon-Assas) to the Masters’ students reading International Administration.  The guest lecture took place in the Salle des Conseils opposite the Panthéon in Paris, and was coordinated by Anne-Marie Thévenot-Werner, doctor at University Paris I and author of Le droit des agents internationaux à un recours effectif, and Carolyne Clermont, Master 2 student at Paris I.

The presentation (“Is there a common IAL beyond the law of the international civil service? – A comparison between principles applied to disciplinary law in the international civil service and to the sanction systems developed by MDBs”) explored the extent to which a common international administrative law exists beyond what has traditionally been reserved to the law of the international civil service.  By comparing the disciplinary process within the internal justice systems of international organisations with the sanctions systems developed by Multilateral Development Banks, a number of common principles which have come out of the judgments of international administrative tribunals (e.g., the World Bank Administrative Tribunal) and international sanctions bodies (e.g., the World Bank Sanctions Board) can be identified, pointing to an evolving common international administrative law based on general principles of international law and best practices.  Alex also gave advice on legal careers in international law in both the private sector and international organisations.

eu_law_news

The EU Court’s Grand Chamber supports equality and the rule of law in EU Missions

By | IAL, International Administrative Law, News, Rule of Law | No Comments

In a long awaited judgment the Grand Chamber of the Court of Justice of the European Union (‘CJEU’) found on appeal that it has jurisdiction in an employment dispute brought by an Italian magistrate who was seconded by her government to the CDSP mission in Bosnia Herzegovina.

In the Case C‑455/14 P H vs. Council of the European Union and the European Commission and the European Union Police Mission (EUPM) in Bosnia and Herzegovina the claimant brought a legal suit before the EU General Court seeking the annulment of a re-deployment decision adopted by the Head of the EUPM and compensation for harm suffered as a result of alleged psychological harassment.

In an earlier decision refusing the claim the EU General Court ruled on 10 July 2014 in H v Council and Others (T‑271/10) that it lacked jurisdiction since the contested decisions fell within the EU’s Common Foreign Security Policy (‘CFSP’) and relied upon provisions that set out that the CJEU shall not have jurisdiction over provisions relating to the CFSP norwith respect to acts adopted on the basis of those provisions.

The Grand Chamber ruling on 19th July 2016 found that pursuant to the aforementioned provisions, the CJEU does not, in principle, have jurisdiction on the provisions of, or acts adopted under, the CSFP. The Court then observed that the European Union was founded, in particular, on the values of equality and the rule of law stating:

“The very existence of effective judicial review designed to ensure compliance with provisions of EU law is inherent in the existence of the rule of law”.

Whilst the ruling acknowledged that the contested decisions were admittedly set in the context of the CFSP it added that this does not necessarily exclude the jurisdiction of the EU judicature. The Grand Chamber then referred to the fact that the EU judicature had jurisdiction to rule on all actions brought by EU staff members having been seconded to the EUPM. It noted that staff members seconded by the Member States and those seconded by the EU institutions were subject to the same rules so far as concerns the performance of their duties ‘at theatre level’.

Indeed, the decisions adopted by the authorities of that mission, which related to the allocation of human resources assigned to it by the EU institutions and Member States, did have an operational element, which fell within the CFSP. However, by their very essence, they also constitute acts of staff management. Consequently, it was held that the jurisdiction of the EU judicature should not be excluded from reviewing acts of staff management that relate to staff members seconded by the Member States.

Finally the Grand Chamber held that the contested decisions were only imputable to the Council and that, accordingly, the action was admissible only in so far as it was directed against the Council. The case was referred back to the General Court for judgment on the substance of the action.

The Grand Chamber’s judgment is very welcome news for more than 1500 staff who currently serve with CSDP missions, in some of the most dangerous parts of the world. It is an important step towards bringing missions under judicial scrutiny, thus achieving greater legal accountability. It is expected that the case-law of the CJEU will also serve as an important tool for policy change and as guidance for human resources officials in CSDP missions, seconding institutions and employees serving in CSDP missions alike.

In conclusion, the Grand Chamber has made an important ruling by permitting effective judicial review of staff management decisions by a CSDP mission, thusensuring compliance with EU law, including the EU Charter, and bringing a welcome boost to the morale of staff upon whom the success of such missions ultimately depends.

View full decision >

antje_conf_news_2

Antje Kunst provides lecture to a delegation of the Vietnamese bar federation

By | IAL, International Administrative Law, News | No Comments

On 6 July 2016, Antje Kunst from Bretton Woods Law provided a lecture to a delegation of the Vietnamese bar federation during a study trip organized by the German Federal Bar and the Foundation for International Legal Cooperation (IRZ).

The German Federal Bar (Bundesrechtsanwaltskammer) is the umbrella organization of the 28 regional Bars in Germany (Rechtsanwaltskammern) and safeguards the professional interests of all lawyers in Germany at a federal, European and international level.

The delegation consisted of the vice-president of the Vietnam Bar Federation and vice-presidents of several regional bar associations in Vietnam.

Antje provided a lecture on risks and threats of corruption and the legal profession setting out inter alia the results of the IBA OECD and UNODC survey of 2010 in this area. She explained international anti-corruption instruments such as UNCAC, its implementation review process and requirements on preventive measures and criminal sanctions. She elaborated on the IBA international principles on conduct for the legal profession of 2011, i.e. independence, integrity, avoidance of conflicts of interest and confidentiality/professional secrecy. She discussed with her Vietnamese colleagues specific corruption risks for the legal profession such as the attorney-client privilege and the instruction of lawyers as intermediaries or agents (especially in international business transactions).

She highlighted the role of the legal profession can play in the international fight against corruption referring to the IBA Anti-Corruption Guidance for Bar Associations: Creating, Developing and Promoting Anti-Corruption Initiatives for the Legal Profession. Her Vietnamese colleagues provided interesting insights on corruption in the justice sector, the national anti-corruption legislation, projects and efforts to curb corruption including in the legal profession and the challenges faced.

news_rishi_conf

BWL Academic Member – Rishi Gulati – Presents at NYU on International Organisations Immunities on 11 April 2016

By | Administrative Law, IAL, International Administrative Law, Multilateral Development Banks, News | No Comments

Monday, April 11, 2016  |  12:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Seminar Room 110, Furman Hall, 245 Sullivan Street

IO Immunity: Access to Justice Denied?

International Organisations (“IOs”) enjoy jurisdictional immunities before domestic courts.  The effect of such immunities is that, generally speaking, national courts refuse to adjudicate disputes where an IO is sued, and where that IO refuses to waive its immunity from suit. Traditionally, IO immunities have been absolute, and generally speaking domestic courts refuse to pierce it. This means that often, individuals and private parties who may have a grievance against an IO, in seeking a remedy, are left to the mercy of the IO’s internal justice system, or to alternative forms of dispute resolution such as arbitration, which can be expensive and opaque. 

In this presentation, I will first, highlight the kinds of disputes that may arise between IOs and private parties. Second, I focus on disputes between IOs and its staff, a common occurrence, showing that such employees may often be left without a remedy. Given that such cases arise frequently, this is a fertile ground to analyse how the principles on IO immunities are developing and work in practice. Finally, I discuss the ongoing Haiti litigation, and the case law from the European Court of Human Rights regarding the right to access to courts and its bearing on IO immunity. I will conclude by making observations whether or not these decisions have succeeded in enhancing access to justice.

Further details > 

grassi_article

The EBRDAT reaffirms the application of general principles of international administrative law to the internal law of the EBRD and criticises it for being “exceedingly pedantic”

By | Administrative Law, IAL, International Administrative Law, Multilateral Development Banks, News | One Comment

Following the successful appeals to the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development Administrative Tribunal (“EBRDAT”) in the cases of Kominek & Others v EBRD (see: EBRD 2013/AT/01 and EBRD 2013/AT/02), Neil Macaulay and Alex Haines of Bretton Woods Law (“BWL”) have secured another victory in the case of Grassi v EBRD (see: EBRD 2016/AT/01).  On the 18th January 2016, the EBRDAT allowed Mr Grassi’s (“Appellant”) appeal against the 9th September 2015 decision by the EBRD President adopting the recommendation of the Bank’s Grievance Committee (“GC”).  The GC, which sits as the body of first instance in the Bank’s internal justice system and below the EBRDAT, had recommended not to exercise its jurisdiction over all the elements contained in the Appellant’s ‘Request for an Administrative Review Decision’ (“RARD”) on the basis that it had been submitted outside the relevant procedural deadline, and was thus time-barred.  The time limit for the submission of the Appellant’s RARD landed on a non-working day (i.e., Saturday) but was submitted the next working day (i.e., Monday).  The EBRDAT found that, contrary to the GC’s recommendation and contrary to the Bank’s arguments, the Appellant’s RARD had, in fact, been timely submitted on the Monday, even if, strictly speaking, it came after the Saturday deadline.  The EBRDAT had “no hesitation to ‘remedy’ the anomaly in the Grievance Procedures by way of a liberal interpretation” (see: paragraph 33 of the judgment).

The EBRDAT’s judgment adopted the arguments raised by the Appellant, and relied, inter alia, on best practices of other Multilateral Development Banks (“MDBs”) (e.g., the International Monetary Fund (“IMF”) and the African Development Bank (“AfDB”)).  The rules of procedure at the Administrative Tribunals of a number of international organisations allow, as do many national systems, for the filing of a grievance on a ‘next working day’, thus preventing the unfair situation that had arisen in the Appellant’s case.  The Bank had argued that the procedural rules should be interpreted strictly, despite the apparent prejudice in this case.  The EBRDAT, however, relied on a judgment from the Administrative Tribunal of the International Labour Organisation (“ILOAT“) (see: Judgement No. 2882, at consideration 6) and further found that “the Bank’s interpretation is exceedingly pedantic and formalistic, and would unduly hinder the Staff Member from defending his right effectively” (see: EBRD 2016/AT/01, at paragraph 33).

In its judgement, the EBRDAT also took into account of the contra proferentem rule, natural justice, and fairness as a principle of international administrative law.  Although the EBRDAT did not take the case of Kominek into account because its facts were different, that case also resulted in the EBRAT criticising the Bank for complicating matters unnecessarily: “Voluminous arguments and numerous documents have been submitted to the Judges, who have read them and concluded that this matter has been treated by the Bank as exceedingly complex when it is in effect quite simple. Indeed, it seems important that ordinary Staff Members perceive that the options for vindicating their rights are straightforward, lest they be intimidated by the ostensible prolixity (and attended costs) of the grievance system” (see: EBRD 2013/AT/01, at paragraph 21).

The latest EBRDAT decision is a victory for common sense: it remedies an exceedingly pedantic and formalistic approach depriving staff members from effectively defending their rights naturally, justly and fairly; it provides useful guidance for the GC on how to interpret the Bank’s internal laws; and it reaffirms the application of general principles of international administrative law to the internal law of the Bank with a view to filling its lacunas.

Read more >

The BWL IAL team can be contacted at enquires@brettonwoodslaw.com

 

landmark_prosecutions

Landmark prosecutions under Australian Foreign Fighters Legislation and the role of international law

By | IAL, International Administrative Law, News | No Comments

Returning foreign fighters from Syria have posed a legal challenge for domestic prosecuting authorities. BWL Academic Member and Australian Barrister, Rishi Gulati has undertaken work in the national security law area. In an interview with Radio National of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation on 17th November 2015, Rishi discusses a landmark case in Melbourne that is likely to set a legal precedent for returning foreign fighters.

 

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/breakfast/landmark-case-in-melbourne-to-set-legal/7036200

 

jazz_seminar_rome

Bretton Woods Law speaking in at British Embassy in Vienna and La Sapienza University in Rome

By | Administrative Law, IAL, International Administrative Law, News | No Comments

On 27th November, Bretton Woods Law presented a seminar on international administrative law in Vienna. Hosted in conjunction with the British Embassy in Vienna and UK Trade and Investment (‘UKTI’) at the Residence of HE the British Ambassador, some 38 delegates from 25 different international organisations attended for a selection of lectures presented by members of BWL covering themes such as fundamental and essential rights, harassment, the big issues of IAL and litigating before administrative tribunals and legal insurance.

This event follows BWL’s participation in the Round Table at La Sapienza University in Rome on 6th November, which focused on the theme of ‘right of appeal in international administrative courts. The Round Table was organised by the Committee of Staff Representatives of the Co-ordinated Organisations (‘CRP’), the Association of Scholars of International and European Law, the University of Rome La Sapienza’s Department of Communication and Social Research, the Journal of the International Legal Cooperation, KorEuropa (On-line Journal of the European Documentation Centre of the Kore University of Enna), the International Law and European Union Law Series (Aracne Ed.). Jazz Omari delivered a presentation entitled ‘Should an appeal mechanism be introduced against rulings by the courts of International financial institutions?’ which compared the current structure of the internal justice systems at multilateral development banks and examined possible structural reforms devised by Lee Marler. The Round Table received a Medal of the Presidency of the Italian Republic and the presentations shall be published by Aracne Editions in the new year.

king_college_news

The International Administrative Law Centre of Excellence publishes the Internal Justice Systems of International Organisations Legitimacy Index 2015

By | IAL, International Administrative Law, News | One Comment

On 1st and 2nd October 2015, the third annual International Administrative Law (“IAL”) Centre of Excellence conference took place at King’s College, London, where delegates represented 26 international organisations, including the World Bank, the EU, UNIDO, EPO, WHO, WTO, EBRD, AsDB, IAEA, OECD and OECD.

The IAL Centre of Excellence annual conference brought together international civil servants, union representatives, independent lawyers and lawyers for human resources and management, academics, and others interested in IAL from around the world, with a view to shaping and improving this area of the law.

The conference topics included recent developments in IAL, the concept of fairness, whistleblower protection at the UN, updates on legal insurance and class actions, the EU courts and violation of Article 6 ECHR.

The conference culminated with the presentation of the second version (2015) of the IAL Centre of Excellence’s Internal Justice of International Organisation Legitimacy Index. The 2015 version of the Index comprises of 28 international organisations of different sizes and from different continents, and ranks the internal justice systems of international organisations against one another with reference to customary international human rights law and general principles of international law.

Access the 2015 Index and more general information on the IAL Centre of Excellence

 

alex_counsel_of_Europe

Alex Haines presents to the Council of Europe in Strasbourg for the Administrative Tribunal’s 50th anniversary

By | Administrative Law, IAL, International Administrative Law, News | No Comments

Earlier this year, Alex Haines from Bretton Woods law gave a presentation on the Appeals Systems of international organisations at the Council of Europe in Strasbourg for its Administrative Tribunal’s 50th anniversary: The International Colloquy of the Administrative Tribunal – Common focus and autonomy of international administrative tribunals.

[icon_button type=arrowright target=blank url=http://clients.dbee.com/coe/webcast/index.php?id=20150319-1&lang=lang&ch=28]Watch the presentation[/icon_button]

International Colloquy of the Administrative Tribunal